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and republicans that education is the solution to the problem. if we just figure out better to educate our poor kids we could reduce the inequality. and the president today acknowledged that may not be enough. >> the outcomes we're having today, the health care, the budget, reforming our financial systems, all of these things will have a practical effect on americans, i am convinced the decisions we make in the next few years, will determine whether or not america will be the country where children can grow up and have opportunities that are real. >> i have seen you talk about your work in education as fundamentally driven towards precisely the kinds of goals the president talks about today. reducing inequality. expanding social mobility. and i wonder what your take is on how much of that can be achieved through education, while we have seen outside the schools such a massively expanding amount of poor people. >> yeah, i think part of the problem that we have in the debate today is that people think that you either have to solve the problem of poverty through social programs or it is all about
.com to connect with a patient advocate from abbvie for one-to-one support and education. to help secure retirements and protect financial futures. to help communities recover and rebuild. for companies going from garage to global. on the ground, in the air, even into space. we repaid every dollar america lent us. and gave america back a profit. we're here to keep our promises. to help you realize a better tomorrow. from the families of aig, happy holidays. is what makes us different. we take the time to get to know you and your unique health needs. then we help create a personalized healthcare experience that works for you. and you. and you. with 50 years of know-how, and a dedicated network of doctors, health coaches, and wellness experts, we're a partner you can rely on -- today, and tomorrow. we're going beyond insurance to become your partner in health. humana. [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. [ m'm... ] great taste. [ tapping
and being responsive and looking at workers compensation reform or hiving -- or having a highly educated labor sector. drive an things help economy. people in the past said, well, we really don't have enough fossil fuel supply. but now we know, through technology and innovation, having the good and fair regulations, that we do have energy supply. so my state of oklahoma, since 2011 when i took office because of our business-friendly policies, education, reform we have done, making government smaller and more efficient, we have seen our economy change. the per capita income has grown by 8% for a family of four. >> it is self-defense. you have a guy who will steal every last job from you if they can. rick perry -- he is glad they are up here right now. while we are up here talking, he had his people on the phone to ohio and oklahoma stealing their jobs. >> we fish where the fish are. and generally speaking, i am spending a lot more time in california or illinois and new york than i am in oklahoma. >> we just beat him in football. [laughter] >> you know how to hurt a person, mary. >> but li
, julie has done on affordable care act. a lot to talk about today including some disturbing education all rankings coming out. >> we'll get to that. we'll begin with the train derailment in new york. federal investigators are turning their attention to the engineer as new revelations of just how fast the train was going. the train was going 82 miles per hour when it took that curve. it should have been traveling at just 30 miles per hour. nbc's tom costello has the latest on the investigation. >> reporter: on the tracks in the bronx mta crews lifted the remains of the broken train as crash investigators went in for a closer look. tons of twisted steel scraped and crushed from sunday's violent crash. the ntsb announced the two black boxes recovered from the train revealed a stunning development. >> train was traveling at approximately 82 miles per hour as it went into a 30 mile-per-hour curve. >> reporter: 82 miles per hour. only six seconds before the train came to a complete second engine power was cutback. then the engineer suddenly applied full brakes. >> when i heard about the speed,
education to health care to a safe shelter from the streets, which means that you're harnessing the power of community to expand opportunity for folks here in d.c. and your work reflects a tradition that runs through our history. the belief that we're greater together than we are on our own. and that's what i've come here to talk about today. now, over the last two months, washington has been dominated by some pretty contentious debates. i think that's fair to say. and between a reckless shutdown by congressional republicans in an effort to repeal the affordable care act and admittedly poor execution on my administration's part in implementing the latest stage of the new law, nobody has acquitted themselves very well these past few months, so it's not surprising that the american people's frustrations with washington are at an all-time high. but we know that people's frustrations run deeper than these most recent political battles. their frustrations rooted in their own daily battles, to make ends meet, to pay for college, buy a home, save for retirement. it's rooted in the nagging sense
online already. martha: disappointing news about america's education system. according to the latest survey when it comes to major subjects like math, reading and signs, u.s. teenagers fall ray behind their counter parts in asia and europe. gregg palkot is live in london to tell us more about these results. >> reporter: the international report card for schools is out. it comes from the well-regarded oedd. while we don't get an f it feels like a c. our teenagers are 20th in the world in reading skills and a as for math, 28 other countries are ahead of our teenagers. here is what they have to say about our results. >> at the end of the day quality of outcome and quality of education can never exceed the quality of instruction. >> reporter: we have had a statement from the education secretary. he calls it a picture of stagnation. while things have not gotten worse. our rankings have split because others have gotten better'. chinese cities like beijing and hong kong lead the way. in a heating unglobal economy strong numbers. martha: we are spending more money, we have more technology be
because she lacks a decent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own. that should offend all of us. and it should compel us to action. we are a better country than this. >> i mean, when we get to the point where children in no fault of their own are living in these situations and it's just discarded, that's troubling about the spirit of the country and those that are in government, congressman. >> well, a nation that wants to consider itself respectful and decent ought to want to have its citizens live a respectful and decent life. and to do so you've got to pay people a decent wage. we've got to raise the wage from $7.25 to $9. just think about this. in 1938 fdr was successful in getting the minimum wage raised. and from 1938 to 2013 it's raised only $7. they are having difficulty surviving. this nation is not a mean spirited nation. and the majority of the people, i think, go along with what we're saying. the problem is it will never be brought up to a vote here in the house of representatives. >> when the congressman says this is not a mean spirited
together, he a democrat, i, a republican. each other and share ideas on tax reform, on education reform. on getting things done. we love the environment on you can actually achieve results. that's the great thing of being a governor. i look at so many of the members of the utah state legislature who are here. and with each one of them, i can tell you stories about how we things done and the can-do attitude. it was remarkable. senate went on to the and became terribly frustrated with the culture that existed on that l hill, something evan knows a lot about. ournt on to china to become senior diplomat running the embassy there. nd we kind of regrouped a little bit later when joe and nancy jacobson, who was the power behind no labels initially came and said would you like to ecome part of the no labels movement. what on earth is no labels? is it a third party effort to ind of ship wreck the republicans and the democrats. is it a bunch of mushy moderates to get together to take over the world? none of the above. ome to find that it is a group that respects the fact that we system.two-party
poetry. he wanted what he called a western-style education. i think that stays with me. especially in this holiday season, we forget what we have. a western-style education. this guy was willing to do anything for it. and rebel against his parents. what he wanted more than anything else. he didn't even see that he was going to become this worldwide legend. >> dana be an bob both have questions. we'll begin with dana. >> i'm curious about how it was that you were plucked out of the crowd, of all the joushallists that were there, how did it come to be that you were chosen, to get a chance to talk to him? i know you worked it a little bit. i would love to hear that story. the second question i have is what is the toughest question that he asked you in those interviews? >> you know, dana, i like the way you put it. i worked it. i did work it, my friend. because what happened was, everybody was being turned away. everybody wanted time with nelson mandela after he first got out. here he is at his home. what happened was i had written a book about the american civil rights movement, "eyes
of that and the policy and educational piece you're trying to work on. it seems different. if you can, tell us anything about what happened at the white house today. >> sure thing. the first thing to say if we know anything from polls young people remain immensely uneducated about this law. only a tiny percentage of young people who know what's in the bill. here at policy mic, the big reason we're launching this to have our generation submit ideas on how to get them signed up and have a conversation. fact we're here at the white house validates the conversation we're having on our site will be a real conversation that people will be taking seriously and listening to. the exciting thing is the top three most voted on ideas will get a response from the white house. we're excited to have this conversation with young people. >> i find what you guys are doing so interesting and so important. you guys are both working together own health care, it seems you're doing a better job than congress these days. as a republican, the republicans are trying to find their way in this conversation. what is your message t
mandela and it will be tomorrow at f and b stadium in johannesburg and a belief that education was the only way for people to raise up from poverty and where that legacy stands today. and revolutionary cancer treatment and using one deadly disease to battle another. >> i'm mark and coming up, the afc race is heating up as manning is a leg up on the competition, that is ahead in sports. >>> wintry conditions will improve today but i'm tracking another round of snow for the northeast, i'll have details coming up. >>> al jazeera america continues and thomas and i are back with you in just 2 1/2 minutes. ♪ straight to the point. >> i'm on the ground every day finding stories that matter to you. >> in new orleans... >> seattle bureau... >> washington... >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news. >> from our headquarters in new york, here are the headlines this hour. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> a deal in the senate may be a
at the town hall education. the art and recreation campus. what we are looking at is the president of the american center for progress. she is offering opening statements. the president is expected to walk up to the podium any minute now. when he gets up there he is expected no the to talk about any specific policy. the changes or announcements or proposals. instead he will urge congress to pass a budget and extend unemployment insurance by the end of the year. the president will now address a full audience. >> thank you so much. thank you, everybody. please have a seat. sharing a story that resonated with me and there a lot of parallels in my life and resonated with some of you. over the past years, the center for american progress has done incredible work to shape the debate over expanding opportunity for all americans. i could not be more grateful not only for giving me a lot of policy ideas, but a lot of staff. my friend john ran my transition. my chief of staff dennis mcdonough did the cap. you guys are doing a good job training folks. i want to thank all the members of congre
efficiencies, how we support education. >> i want to get to that in a moment. you have a long, deeply personal relationship with howard that dates back 25 years, when you were just 16. tell us the story of what brought you to howard university. >> at the age of 16, i was probably 80 pounds. i suffered from sickle cell anemia. i came to howard university because howard had a sickle cell center. my mom, a nurse, thought it would be a safe place healthwise. the second reason is because i wanted to pursue becoming a physician. i looked across the spectrum of universities that would give me that opportunity, howard had the best fit. my former prime minister, founder, father of our nation, as it were, who brought us into independence was a political professor at howard university. it has a strong name in the caribbean and was a strong connection for me. >> you come from trinidad and tobego. >> that is correct. >> you are a surgical oncologist by training. are you still practicing? >> on a limited basis. my operating room, my classroom as it were, day-to-day activities of administration plus my skill
and schools were built so that now kids, including her son, can have an education. alex? >> that's a great story too. you've got so many from there, michelle. very quickly, the memorial tuesday, because of the enormity of that stadium in which it's going to be held s that the one that is being more focused upon and also given all the world leaders that are expected to attend, that over the funeral on sunday next week? >> reporter: it does require logistical planning. however, i will say the state funeral, which is going to be big, is in a remote village, his hometown. so people are going to have to get there. that's going to be a difficult process as well. that is expected to be huge because it's really going to be the last step in this mourning process. world leaders, some of them, we don't know exactly who yet, are expected to attend that as well. but all of this has had that sense of importance, this outpouring. just standing out here, you know, these beautiful, spontaneous songs will break out. the entire crowd joins in or just walking down a street. you walk by someone and they're jus
to destroy public education, attack the voting block, attack the unions in detroit, and it has really been the focal point to privatize everything they can get their hands on. i have a jaded opinion in all of this. i actually believe in american workers. i believe that workers should not be sacrificed if there are policies and market forces that are having a big impact on a city. i believe that we have an obligation to workers. i want to throw some numbers at you tonight. i know, we've got numbers. but, you know, conservatives, they like numbers. $24 billion. that's the cost of the last shutdown. i haven't heard any conservatives in washington raise any problem with that at all. haven't heard anything about offsets. $24 billion? well, when it's their way, they throw around billion-dollar bills like they're $5 bills. that's what the shutdown cost. so i understand debt. okay? and i think everybody in america has some level of debt in their life. $18 billion debt to the city of detroit, that's pretty hefty, no getting around that. no question about that. but when you have $66 million of state
, whether it's a much bigger or more inclusive middle class including blacks, whether it's better education, but you're absolutely right. the project is not finished. in fact, even particularly amongst the blacks, there is a massive income inequality, one of the biggest in the world. very, very poor people still living in shantytowns and the like while there is also at the same time a very rich and exploding black you know, economic super class. so that is an issue. the issue of corruption is still one that's alive and needs to be tackled. and the issue of education still needs to be tackled. he was very keen on the idea of education. but look, many people will say some of the very important things were not done. and they still have to be finished, but after mandela was released and after those first elections in south africa, so much more of this continent has become democratic. it's not a coincidence. >> christiane, so many world leaders when you talk about the leader of cuba, the united states and europe and african countries, it could not be more diverse. do you think there is a lesson,
to learn about risk management. more and more companies like td ameritrade are taking all of the education and insights that they need to know and delivering it free of charge. >> is that like the casino? >> i do not think so. in terms of the sustainability of my business, i will continue to have a job. education is a key component of that. the more successful our clients are, the more successful our businesses will be. >> next question. the amount of options and derivatives in td ameritrade at the time was about 9% of volume. it is now in the mid-40's. that is incredible growth. there is a different climate. how do we move this huge growth down to this younger generation? how do we make it so that it is investable for them? >> absolutely. this goes back to what i was saying before. make sure you are providing the tools for that younger generation. think about how they live now. they are gaming on their mobile devices. it could be video or written. they like to follow and interact socially. that is one of the things that we have done with dough. we provide all of those avenues for the youn
. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. new business owner, it would be one thing i've learned is my philosophy is real simple american express open forum is an on-line community, that helps our members connect and share ideas to make smart business decisions. if you mess up, fess up. be your partners best partner. we built it for our members, but it's open for everyone. there's not one way to do something. no details too small. american express open forum. this is what membership is. this is what membership does. it gets more and more entertaining every day. and once you've got verizon fios, that's when you get it. america's fastest, most reliable internet takes your entertainment to ridiculous levels. i was streaming videos, movies, music. once i realized how fast it was, that's when i got it. [ male announcer ] and now you can get the ultimate holiday gift! get the fios triple play for just
work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. ...are the hands that do good things for the whole community: thvie enronment, seniors, kids, and animals. that's why we created the share the love event. by the end of this year, the total donated by subaru could reach 35 million dollars. you get a great deal on a new subaru. we'll donate 250 dollars to a choice of charities that benefit your community. it feels good to be a helping hand. >>> that's going to do it for 9 news at 6:00. we apologize we did not get to bring you peggy fox's story on that new virginia state police safety app. we will have it for you tonight at your only local news at 7:00. >> we've got to say good-bye to our fantastic director. this is his last show here. robin, we wish >> pelley: tonight, celebrating mandela. south africans pay tribute to the father of their country as the
-paying jobs. 40,000 in education and health care. 27,000 in manufacturing. 17,000 construction jobs. so they're coming in the right places. they're coming slower than people wanted, but don't forget. we came from a very, very dark place. and so the light is starting to shine. >> the unemployment picture is encouraging for a lot of people. for men the rate is 6.7%. for women, 6.2%. but really discouraging for african-americans. 12.5% don't have a job. and look at teenagers. nearly 21% are out of work. nationwide, long-term unemployment is not improving. more than 4 million people have been out of work for six months or longer. still, eye glass designer warby parker is hiring. software engineers and retail employees. >> we're currently planning for 2014. looks like we'll hire about 150 people next year. >> reporter: tonight reason for optimism with the unemployment rate the lowest in five years. tom costello, nbc news, washington. >>> and on this friday night, there's much more still ahead for us including the americans touched by mandela during his time in america. >>> nelson mandela was sent
are much more highly educated and well trained. they are dealing with complex software systems and they are costing more because we invest a lot more in them and it costs more to retain them. there are opportunities in the private sector that are greater. part of the thing driving these military personnel costs to some degree is the technological advancement and the fact that we are expecting -- what we are expecting out of them in terms of training and performance is higher than it was 23 years ago. host: earlier you mentioned the cost of military pay. a "new york times" op-ed last month suggested that military pay should be put on the table. host: do you think it is likely that pay would be a target as the pentagon looks to cut costs? guest: i think that pay as a target is an interesting idea. i don't think anyone is going to flat-out reduce military pay. "the new york times" editorial notes this is a politically and emotionally fraught area of the budget to be debating. i cannot imagine an area where people would be saying you are going to be getting less than this year. wha
american education policy in connecticut. >> on august 9, 1974 vice president ford was sworn in as president of the united states. this is the dress that ms. ford was wearing at the swearing in ceremony. she was less than excited about becoming first lady but president ford encouraged her saying we can do this. she resolved if i have to do this, i'm going to have fun doing it. within 10-days she had a state dinner to entertain king hussein of jordan. she had to prepare for that as her role of first lady and she hit the ground running. first lady betty ford monday night at 9:00 eastern. >> next is constitution and role judges with supreme court thomas. this is from the 2013 lawyer's convention in washington, d.c. it's a little less than an hour. >> thank you, david. could evening, everyone. it is my great honor and pleasure to introduce our distinguished guest this evening. although much of what i might say by way of introduction is no doubt familiar to all of you. justice clarence thomas has served with great distinction on the united states supreme court for more than two de
of the sixth sense, says there are five things we can do to fix education in america >> the united states has education apartheid, that's the facts... >> talk to al jazeera with m. night shayamalan sunday at 7et / 4pt on al jazeera america >> anest natean estimated 131 mn americans have gone online and spent big bucks. sales could top $2 billion. that would be a cyberrecord and 20% more than a year ago. online growth has been bigger than growth at bricks and mortar stores. and david strawser said it's been an especially hard year for retailers. >> the low-and middle-class has been tough this year. the housing sector has done well. home depot and lowes has done well. the rest of retail has really struggled. >> joining us is stephanie humphrey tech lifestyle writer for" efor eboni.com. welcome. >> thank you for having me. >> so how does this change over time? >> i don't think it's going to happen any time soon, either. i think what you're going to see is more of that technology integration kind of into the overall shopping experience. >> can bricks and mortar stores do anything to turn the tren
faith and insistence on the importance of education, and his personal dignity and strength in the face of the injustices of the segregated south taught our supreme court justice everything he needed to know to meet the challenges and opportunities that were ahead of him. the sisters at saint benedict and saint pius added a few things too. [laughter] initially, young clarence thomas was called to the priesthood and he entered the seminary. the call gradually lost its strength and a bigoted comment by another extinguished his determination. -- his location -- his vocation. in fall 1968, he enrolled at holy cross college. yale law school came next. after earning the elite degree, he had difficulty finding a big- city law firm job. so he accepted an offer from the attorney general of missouri and served as an assistant attorney general in jefferson city from 1974 to 1977. after a brief stint in corporate law, he followed the then senator danforth to washington, d.c. in 1979, just in time for the reagan revolution. over the next dozen years, clarence thomas served in all three branches of g
education for their children. >> so the president did the talk about income inequality and trying to raise that. look. it's going to be different in different places and at some level, can we depend upon the federal government to make that kind of change or is it going to be a case by case community? are we going to create a patchwork of what a minimum wage can be? >> i think it is going to be by community, by the jurisdiction, by city boy city because east city has a different cost of living. here in the district of columbia, it's extremely costly to live in the nation's capitol. wages are somewhere around $35 per hour. so even at $11 and $0.50 per hour, that's less than $25,000 a year. so you would need to have another person join with you just to get to a 50,000 dollar household to be able to go out and try to find affected alan hou affordable housing? >> some say this tends to dampen employment and you have to increase wages to workers, you might higher fewer people. >> that isn't true. the d.c. chamber represent wal-mart. my job is to represent the general welfare of the citizens. >>
. >> start with one issue education... gun control... the gap between rich and poor... job creation... climate change... tax policy... the economy... iran... healthcare... ad guests on all sides of the debate. >> this is a right we should all have... >> it's just the way it is... >> there's something seriously wrong... >> there's been acrimony... >> the conservative ideal... >> it's an urgent need... and a host willing to ask the tough questions >> how do you explain it to yourself? and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5 eastern only on al jazeera america >>> welcome back. the city of detroit is the now officially bankrupt. the questions on the mind of many city workers is what will happen to our pensions. it's not clear just yet. it's on the lips of many others who live in struggling municipalities around the country. already lessons to be learned from cities and towns and countries who have received pensions. it could offer clues. for example, rhode island, a community close to emerging from bankruptcy now but cut 25% of worker pensions. 20%
educated, sophisticated man. he knew white south africa, black south africa, poor south africa, wealthy south africa. one of his supporters said at the time when they were looking for a leader for this mass movement, in walks this six foot two inch massive demand. they said, yup, he is the one. mandela said at one of his first meetings, he stood in the room with the elders and said, i will be the first black president of south africa. he said that in the 1950s. >> and in south africa in recent line, what it was like to up in 1994, that first election. they still had tears in their eyes, still very vivid to them. legacy ofd that the nelson mandela would not be enough, that there was still a lot of work to be done in south africa. the country has problems. it is one of the leading places of rape in the country, aids is rampant. unemployment between the ages of 20 and 50 is more than 50%. but nelson mandela set the stage for the future. of them,t out the best this kind and gentle man. he always made the point, people ask, is he still angry, he said i am still angry but i made a choice. i d
to be a teacher? >> it's an awesome feeling to have brought up children in the multi-racial education society and they have proved that they can make it out there? >> did you have that opportunity? >> no. >> the family is raising a black child and their community, while not fully integrated is more diverse. >> it's not only blacks, only whites. eyes are open. >> today was a national day of prayer and reconciliation anna katrada new man dela for years, including two decades in prison. >> with freedom comes responsibility. freedom did not fall from heaven. >> today, they did say good buy and thanked the man who gave their children the diverse future they never had. >> as perussia put it to me today she was thanking mandel a for creating a special currents tree for her children do -- country for her children to grow up in. >> new mexico new mexico visited l.a. in 1990 after his release from prison. it's a visit that still r resonates with many today. brian rooney has more >> reporter: they remembered new mexico new mexico all day here at the first ame church in los angeles. they say they have f
to education. he could have stayed in his community, but he saw -- he started to see himself as an african, not just as a hoso, he started to see himself and see how the white regime was dividing people by stressing ethnic differences and he was able to overcome that. i think that's such an extraordinary thing. >> it's true. it's true. he was a courageous human being and full of the idea that he was on a journey, and he had something to do, he had a place to be, and it's fabulous to realize that there's an old spiritual, old gospel song which is i'm on my journey now, mount zion, on my journey now, mount zion, and i wouldn't take nothing, mount zion, from my journey. mount zion. he was on the journey and he knew it and he had something to do. and this is what each of us has, if we have enough courage, we can say i'm on a journey, i have a charge to keep. >> you were living in cairo with your husband, south african freedom fighter when you first met nelson mandela. i understand your husband and mandela were something of rivals, but that didn't matter to mandela. tell us about that experienc
. you went to where. >> never mind. >> oh, my god tell me all these educated people on the set what is he trying to say. >> i went to alabama so i can probably explain it better than anybody else. boy that cuts like a knife. >> tell me, what is the concept. >> we don't know how to kick a field goal when we're at the 15 yard line. >> great game. >> is anyone here? >> kicked the ball -- 59 yard kick but we don't kick a 15 yard field goal. anyway, so let me just say there were a lot of people -- i'm going to say two things so you can't jump on me after i say the first thing. okay. >> okay. >> number one i hate to be harold ford everybody told us back in 1996 when we tried to pass welfare reform and limit the number of weeks, months, years people could be on welfare that we were the most cold hearted hateful people of all time and young children would starve and grand mothers would be thrown out in the snow. we were. we were called the most heartless people of all time. we passed it over two bill clinton wes to. he signed at any time third time. most everybody said that it was a great s
their families, maybe to send their kids to school for a better education and a better future. failing to do that does just the opposite. i'd ask the senator from ohio if he would include in this the affordable care act? mr. brown: yeah, i think that's right. i -- first of all, the points that the assistant majority leader was making about the bipartisanship is -- has been -- i think is exactly right. and what's -- what's most not discouraging but most -- perhaps the most disappointing part of this is even as recently as 2007, president bush signed this bill. we passed it -- it was my first month or two in the senate when we passed it. it was a big bipartisan vote in the house. it was a big bipartisan -- i remember exactly the numbers in the senate. lots of republicans joined i believe almost every democrat or maybe every democrat. but again, it was gladly signed by the republican president of the united states. and you can trace from the time of the minimum wage, when hugo black sat at this desk and helped to write the minimum wage and president roosevelt signed the bill, for all these deca
today, connecticut's governor discusses education legislation passed this his state concerning teacher accountability, charter schools and changes to underperforming k-12 schools. governor malloy has called education the civil rights issue of our time, and he'll talk about hi
in the field of agriculture and agricultural education. thank you, mr. speaker and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. waxman, for five minutes. mr. waxman: thank you very much, mr. speaker. on february 15, a small group of democratic members of the house joined together to form the safe climate caucus. we vowed to come to the house every day to talk about the defining environmental challenge of our time, climate change. today marks the 100th day we have spoken on the house floor. the safe climate caucus is composed of representatives from across this country. we come from the west coast, the east coast, the north and the south and the midwest. we come from coastal regions, urban areas and rural communities. we represent a cross-section of america. we started the safe climate caucus because of the enormous disconnect that exists between what scientists are telling us about the dangers of climate change and the conspiracy of silence and denial that exists in this house. there is a mou
is to remove the barriers that students may see that impact their education in a negative way. >> danielle gill, wusa9. >> well, still to come, the issues congress will be dealing with over the next two days and weeks could take a big bite out of your wallet. topper? >> well, the high and low today we had a break in terms of temperatures. it's a harbinger of things to come. officially 57 was the high. 40 was the low. averages are now down to 50 and 36. i'll mention this again, sunset 4:46. that's as early as it sets and it won't change until december 12th. we'll come back and talk about a spring to winter forecast in a bit. >> but first, getting creative while trying to help people cross the street safely. >>> while we give you new information about being loud in fairfax county. the fairfax county board of supervisors unanimously passed an ordnance last night to let police ticket you if your party is too loud. that would be a misdemeanor offense and come with a fine of up to $500. >>> they are on pace to break the annual gun sales record and some of that credit goes to a pretty brisk business o
. >> you're listening because you want to see whats going to happen. >> get your damn education. >> talk to al jazeera. only on al jazeera america. >> oh my! >> welcome back. here at the morseem, the work of journalists is chronicled and honored in a number you have visits including one which is a tribute to journalists who have fallen while pursuing their stories. one whose short life has inspired creative work, dan eldon who was raised in kenya. he was all of that, brave and bold and lost in a gruesome assault 20 years ago. then he was just 22. and then, eldon was a photo journalist documenting somalia as things spun out of control. on july 12th, 1993, filing a violent assault, protesters in the streets turned on dan and three colleagues working there. they were beaten and stoned to death. in the two deck it's a since that day, dan's mother, cathy, and his sister, set out to preserve the legacy of his brief but quite extraordinary life. it has inspired a number of other documentarians as adam may found when he sat down to speak with dan's mother. >> tell me about dan's work. what was i
and their life. beyond toys. they also contribute to their nieces and nephews education and take them on trips, even if it can be on the verge. >> i'm a bit worried i'm turning my knees into a clothes horse. >> of the problem and i'm fully responsible. no word if any on cold word is coming out just yet and i guess punk?ould be [laughter] >> i will tell you how much i spent because my husband could be watching for my two nephews and my niece but they will get hooked up as christmas. >> you are not spoiling them? , a police officer's brave move to save a teddy bear. watch as he's returns the prized toy to the grateful owner. >> we will soon know where the fbi will build its new headquarters sparking a battle between neighbors. >> taking >> you are watching abc 7 news at 5 on your side. >> operations are underway for possible winter weather. >> to our west, millions are hunkered down to whether that might be the worst ice storm in years. >> good afternoon. when the storm hit last night, you could see that there's already ice coating all of the trees, it was very slippery to walk around and the ki
every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. >>> that's our news for now. the "tonight show" is next. >> we leigh you with the sights and sounds of the christmas tree lighting down on the elipse. good night, everybody. ♪ >> announcer: it's "the tonight show with jay leno," featuring rickey minor and "the tonight show" band. tonight, jay welcomes -- president george w. bush, the music of ben harper with charlie musselwhite and "jaywalking." and now, jay leno! [ cheers and applause ] ♪ [ cheers and applause ] >> jay: thank you very much! [ cheers and applause ] welcome to "the tonight show." oh, boy. getting ready for thanksgiving?
year. 20 young children and six educators were murdered that day on december 14th, 2012. this saturday, marks a year since that horrific event. as you can see the news conference is beginning. we'll monitor what the officials have to say and bring you any headlines moments from now. today's top headlines and brand new stories you will sear here first. jon: the obamacare website gets a makeover. new options are able if you're shopping. with deadline looming do the updates matter? >>> wild weekend weather across the u.s. and more is on the way. meteorologist maria molina on where people should be preparing now. >>> silicon valley versus washington. the nation's top tech companies teaming up to send a message to uncle sam. ease up on all snooping. it is all "happening now." jon: well the obamacare website getting a face-lift but ongoing problems with the federal exchange may be more than skin deep. i hope you had a good weekend. good morning to you. i'm jon scott. jenna: does obamacare cover facelifts? is that a question we're leading with today. jon: let's hope not. >> hi, everybody. i'm
, meeting very educated, sophisticated, intelligent black people but who were living in horrible conditions and simply being disgusted coming from the united states watching what was going on in the 1980s and seeing the dramatic change that happened only a few years later in the early '90s. remind our viewers about what has changed in south africa over a relatively short span. >> reporter: well, it's nearly 20 years since democracy here, in 1994 when mandela became the first black president, and just remember, apartheid was a brutal regime but it was made up of lots, hundreds of petty little laws that all together created this racial monster so black people couldn't come into the towns to stay, to live. you know, there was a real sense of two separate nations. nelson mandela along with many of the anc and other political parties all created the environment by which this was broken over the decades. it didn't take a short time to do. it was years and years and years of protests and of defiance. here's a life that is remarkable. started in 1918 at the end of the first world war. let's take a
. this is the president of the association. >> after the survey touches everyone, it's important because it's education and communication. >> reporter: another issue, high school start times. some think 7:20 is too early. teacher who is responded said there are benefits to a later start, mainly more sleep for students, in turn, making them more alert in class. not all the teachers are in support of later start times. in the comment section of that survey, we found some teachers worry, if students are going in later, they will stay up later at night. they worry sports and other activities will be negatively affected and the teachers worry, if they get out later, they will hit rush hour on their commute home. school board members say the results help highlight employee concerns and teachers like paul are hopeful, but stress time is of the essence. >> if we are in a stalling pattern next year, it's going to be a telling issue. >> reporter: in fairfax, virginia, i'm david culver, news 4. >>> a new lottery system started for d.c.'s food trucks. district officials say the goal, to help control the food truck
it will be implemented. ashington journal, live every on ing at 7:00 a.m. eastern c-span. >> the house education examines the college of affordability and the pell grant program. at 10:00 e it live a.m. eastern on c-span 3. eastern, juan manuel santos speaks at the the nal press club about economic and political situation in colombia. that's also live on c-span 3. >> as you walk in, there are tables out in front with lots of right?ts, not the -- prior to entering the gun show. how he pamphlets are about the government is trying to take away the right to own guns and the government is doing this, that. is doing obama care is terrible. those were the guys that i wanted to talk to. were the guys with the leaflets, with the ideas. like this yourself. you?id who are i said i'm a -- i'm an academic. i'm a researcher. the researcher on these rganizations and these ideas and try to understand the guys. and study the men who believe this stuff. said -- they m looked at me. they asked me questions. here's what i ok, am. i don't get it. but here's my job. i want to understand how you guys see the world. i want to u
more pre-k education, employment, raising minimum wage, all things i think people want but where does the money come from, how do they build a coalition. andrea, in congress in the last couple years, coalitions for anything are extremely hard to build. >> the other thing that really caught my attention today was john boehner addressing mike allen's report in "politico" about how republicans are trying to teach their respective members and senate candidates how to appeal to women voters. don't talk about, quote, legitimate rape. this is boehner talking about the coaching practices. >> trying to get them to be a little more sensitive. you know, you look around the congress, there are a lot more females in the democratic caucus than republican caucus. some of our members just aren't as sensitive as they ought to be. >> do you think they are making progress on that front? >> i do. >> they only have 8% of republican caucus. by 3-1 democrats have more women than republicans in congress. just the optics aren't great and some of their senate candidates have been disastrous. >> obviously we kn
the u.s. supreme court declared that separate educational facilities are inherently unequal, the year before we said, separate but equal was dead, south africa codified it, explicitly, for their nation. the apartness, the apartheid system of separate schools, separate hospitals, separate beaches, separate buses, separate park benches, separate everything, everything assigned to specific races, and the lion's share of everything, and of course, the best of everything, reserved only for the white minority. black people had no right to vote. people classified as "colored," for a while, they had a right to vote specifically for white people to represent them, but eventually that was stripped too. only the white minority had the vote in the end. only the white minority was represented in government and only the white minority had any say whatsoever of the affairs in the nation. 80% of the country lived entirely segregated and without representation under white rule. 80% of the country. and by 1960, the resistance to apartheid, the demonstrations against it, had started to zero in on those
declared that separate educational facilities are inherently unequal, the year before we said separate but equal was dead, they codified it for their nation, the apartness, the apartheid, separate park bench, separate everything. everything assigned to specific races, and the lion's share of everything and the best of everything reserved only for the white minority. black people had no right to vote. people classified as colored, for a while they had a right to represent specifically for white people to represent them. but eventually that was stripped too. only the white minority had the vote. only the white minority was represented in government and only the white minority had any say whatsoever in the affairs of the country. 80% of the country lived entirely segregated and without representation under white rule. 80% of the country. and by 1960, the resistance to apartheid, the demonstrations against it had started to zero in on those passbooks, the papers please laws which made your mere existence criminal if you were challenged by a white person as to what you were doing there. in
of leadership, in the case of local government, education, transportation, public safety. >> keynote speaker in hot springs, virginia is texas governor, rick perry. >>> a fire chief is sentenced to two years in jail for fraud and embezzlement. estimated at $140,000, bo taylor was the chief. prosecutors claimed he submitted false invoss for repair work and bought items on a prince william county public school credit card. >>> the u.s. park police has a new top cop. robert mcclain is the acting chief. he succeeds teresa chamber who is is retiring after 35 years in law enforcement. he most recently worked as the commander for homeland security and oversaw operations here in d.c. and new york. he's been with the park police since 1991. >>> just in time for the holidays, not one but two mystery donors come to the rescue. how they helped a church without heat. >>> we are just hours away from an easy way to get to and from baltimore on the weekends. >>> looking live at the ellipse, there she is. a beautiful tree. lit about 20 minutes ago. the show continues. we are waiting to hear from the first la
for the 2010 winter olympics. you really need to educate yourself about brain injuries and how dangerous they can be. after my injury the doctors were saying that the helmet saved my life. wearing a helmet to prevent severe traumatic brain injury is a must... and so is learning what you can do to prevent concussion. ♪ it's not about the money, money, money ♪ >>> beautiful kate middleton, always looks like a million bucks everywhere she goes. so, what if we told you that the glamorous necklace she's wearing right there in that photo, is amazingly affordable. in fact, you could go out and buy the exact same one for yourself today without breaking the bank. and what i love about her style, aside from just being beautiful, she mixes and matches designer duds with affordable things. >> that's a look i try to rock, as well. and sara haines will be modeling that necklace, coming up in "pop news." >>> this is saturday, december 7th. also coming up this half hour, high schools across the country, love to put on the show, "grease." but there's one production that's getting extra attention beca
crohnsandcolitisadvocates.com to connect with a patientadvocae for one-to-one support and education. on the table by not choosing the rit medicare d plan. no one could hav left this much money here. whoo-hoo-hoo! yet many seniors whoompare medicare d plans realize they can save hundreds of dollars. cvs/pharmacy wants to help you save on medicare expenses. talk to your cvs prmacist, ll, or go to cvs.com/compare to get your free, personalized pl comparison today. call, go online, or visit your local store today. >>> welcome back, everybody. now for the latest on our developing story. 85-year-old u.s. war veteran merrill newman is now back at home after north korea releases him after more than a month in captivity. joining us now is an experienced negotiator with north korean authorities, former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. and new mexico governor bill richardson. welcome, sir. great to have you here today. >> thank you. nice to be with you. >> why do you think north korea finally decided to let newman go after all this time? >> well, i believe they realized that their value to them had expired. they
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